", "Bring me blocks of iron." The sun did not rise nor set but Dhul Qarnayn actually found it rising and setting. [6][7] Some modern Muslim scholars are in favor of identifying him with Cyrus the Great.[8]. Sign in to disable ALL ads. ", He said: "This is a mercy from my Lord; but when the promise of my Lord cometh to pass, He will lay it low, for the promise of my Lord is true.". [21] The reasons behind the name "Two-Horned" are somewhat obscure: the scholar al-Tabari (839-923 CE) held it was because he went from one extremity ("horn") of the world to the other,[22] but it may ultimately derive from the image of Alexander wearing the horns of the ram-god Zeus-Ammon, as popularised on coins throughout the Hellenistic Near East. Lexicons inform us that Dhul-Qarnain is an Arabic word that refers to an individual who finds two different centuries. In fact, in all these languages it implies power and glory. The view was reflected in other Islamic sources as well. The name appears three times in the Qur'an. For centuries, most Muslim historians and Qur'anic commentators endorsed the identity of Dhul-Qarnayn as Alexander, though … In recent sources, and in particular, in contemporary scholarships, the views were informed by archeological and linguistic findings as well as some ancient sources of history. According to authentic traditions it wasn’t so. In other words, Allah (s.w.t.) On this view, Gog and Magog refer to the Moguls. "If he tells you about these things, then he is a prophet, so follow him, but if he does not tell you, then he is a man who is making things up, so deal with him as you see fit." The legend allegedly went through much further elaboration in subsequent centuries before eventually finding its way into the Quran through a Syrian version. In addition to a hadith from the Prophet (s), it seems that Wahb b. Munabbih (d. 110/728 and a well-known fabricator of hadiths) was the first person who allegedly identified Dhu l-Qarnayn with Alexander the Great. According to Muslim accounts, this chapter was revealed to Muhammad when his tribe, Quraysh, sent two men to discover whether the Jews, with their superior knowledge of the scriptures, could advise them on whether Muhammad was a true prophet of God. In the East both the Syrian legend and the Quran, according to Ernst, have Alexander/Dhu al-Qarnayn find a people who live so close to the rising sun that they have no protection from its heat. Till, when he reached the rising-place of the sun, he found it rising on a people for whom We had appointed no shelter therefrom. (thou hast authority), either to punish them, or to treat them with kindness. Then We shall gather them together in one gathering. [32][33] According to Wahb ibn Munabbih, as quoted by Ibn Hisham,[34] King Ṣaʿb was a conqueror who was given the epithet Dhu al-Qarnayn after meeting al-Khidr in Jerusalem. : "He of the Two Horns"), also spelled Zu al-Qarnayn, appears in the Quran, Surah Al-Kahf (18), Ayahs 83-101 as one who travels to east and west and erects a wall between mankind and Gog and Magog (called Ya'juj and Ma'juj). (Verses 18:83-98). Totally different views have been suggested in this regard. The Quran narrates the story of how Allah establishes Dhul-Qarnayn as a powerful ruler on earth and allows the king the … Till, when he came between the two mountains, he found upon their hither side a folk that scarce could understand a saying. Others believed that he was not a prophet; rather he was a righteous person and a just king. : "He of the Two Horns"), appears in Quran 18:83-101 as one who travels to … Dhul-Qarneyn means having two horns in the head. [7]:16, According to Muslim records, the Dhu al-Qarnayn story was revealed on the inquisition of Jews who held a high opinion of Cyrus and is also honoured in the Bible; the "He of the Two Horns" (lit. Dhul-Qarnayn demonstrates humility, an essential quality of an ideal leader. [5] However, the supposed influence of the Syriac legends on the Quran have been questioned based on dating inconsistencies and missing key motifs. The name “Dhul-Qarnayn” has been mentioned in surah Kahf. Yet others believed that Khidr was his cousin and was a flag-holder of his army and surpassed him in drinking the Spring of Life. [30] Among Western academics, Brannon Wheeler has argued that the alleged similarities between Alexander romances and the Dhu al-Qarnayn story are actually based on later commentaries of the Qur'an rather than the Qur'an itself.